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Access Press - Minnesota's Disability Community Newspaper

Posts Tagged ‘Luther Granquist’

State special education laws evolved over time

In March 1915 the Minnesota Legislature passed the state’s first special education law. William North, a young man in the brokerage business in Duluth, and Peter H. Konzen, an attorney and former superintendent of schools from Hallock, introduced a bill that allowed school districts to establish special classes for children who were deaf, blind, “mental subnormal” or had speech defects. Dr. E. A. ...

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Then as now, immigration proved to be controversial

Then as now, immigration proved to be controversial Recently, immigration and how it should be regulated has been in the headlines. Unfortunately, a look back to 1888 shows us that stereotypes are not anything new. Rodney A. Mott, the primary player in the establishment of the Minnesota School for the Deaf, stated his case for immigration reform in a speech he gave there on ...

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Pioneering pastor struggled to find transportation

Pioneering pastor struggled to find transportation In June 1972 Barbara Andrews was one of a group of persons with disabilities who urged the Bill of Rights Committee of the Minnesota Constitutional Study Commission to include a provision in the state constitution prohibiting discrimination on the basis of disability. Andrews, who had cerebral palsy and could not drive, described some of the ...

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Then as now, award winner spoke out for our rights

2012 Charlie Smith Award winner Charles Van Heuveln has long been a champion of disability rights. The remarks below by Van Heuveln are excerpted from the record of his testimony of June 21, 1972 to the Minnesota Constitutional Study Commission Bill of Rights Committee. It's time for all physically impaired people to stick up for their ...

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Travel arrangements would be unacceptable today

The Wright County Eagle for Friday, July 31, 1874 reported that Sheriff John Nugent had come through Delano the previous Tuesday while bringing seven-year-old Henry Buri to the Hospital for the Insane in St. Peter. Henry, who lived south of what is now Annandale, had been committed in Wright County Probate Court the day before. His ...

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A leader with promise had life cut short by illness

Anna Johnson, her husband, and her six-month-old child left Norway in April 1868 bound for Fillmore County in Minnesota. The 22-year-old woman was fatigued and ill most of the time on the voyage. On the final leg of her trip, the train trip from Milwaukee to LaCrosse, she became incoherent and confused. After she arrived in ...

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Forgotten lives can now be found

Forgotten lives can now be found More than 2,500 patients lie buried in three St. Peter State Hospital cemeteries. In the earliest cemetery, established shortly after the institution opened in 1866, small wooden crosses with identification tags marked the graves of about 550 patients until a prairie fire destroyed the crosses and tags in 1895. From 1896 to 1913 more than ...

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Dr. Mattocks: an early advocate for Minnesota children

There is a contemporary flavor to newspaper reports of the debate in the 1879 legislature about what to do about “idiot,” “imbecile,” or “feebleminded” children at the Hospital for the Insane in St. Peter. During the 1870s, about fifty children with those labels were committed there. The hospital administration and staff did not want them there, ...

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In a word: Ballot’s outcome hinges on language

“Shall the Minnesota constitution be amended to require all voters to present valid photo identification to vote and to require the state to provide free identification to eligible voters, effective July 1, 2013?”  As Minnesotans prepare to cast ballots in November on a constitutional amendment that would require voters to produce photo identification at the polling ...

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Changes removed barrier to community integration

The Minnesota Department of Human Services agreed in 2011 to develop a comprehensive plan to provide services for persons with disabilities in the “most integrated setting.” This plan, called an “Olmstead plan” in reference to a United States Supreme Court case that supported moving persons with disabilities out of institutions, was part of the settlement ...

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Babies benefitted greatly from one doctor’s research

Babies benefitted greatly from one doctor’s research In October the Minnesota Supreme Court ruled that the Minnesota Department of Health could not retain blood samples from the newborn baby screening program indefinitely or provide them to other researchers without consent from a baby’s parents. This ruling, however, did not affect the newborn screening requirement itself. This program was established in 1965 after ...

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Court approves METO settlement agreement

After a two-hour hearing in federal district court on Thursday, Dec. 1, Judge Donovan Frank ordered final approval of the settlement of the class action lawsuit prompted by excessive use of restraint of residents of the Minnesota Extended Treatment Options (METO) in Cambridge. Parents of three METO residents brought this lawsuit in 2009 and sought ...

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The little girl and the Great Communicator, years later

Thirty years ago, on Nov. 10, 1981, President Ronald Reagan told a story about an Iowa girl story at a press conference. “We just recently received word of a little girl who has spent most of her life in a hospital. The doctors are of the opinion that if she could be sent home and ...

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Acting together is necessary

Acting together is necessary  In 1995 Gov. Arne Carlson’s administration proposed to scale back the Tax Equity & Fiscal Responsibility Act of 1982 (TEFRA) program and to decimate personal care attendant (PCA) services. Dozens of persons with disabilities and their friends and family members, including the newly formed Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities, spoke out at the capitol and ...

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Three women who did their part for children

Three women who did their part for children  Today, agencies provide most of the community-based services for persons with disabilities, generally supported by public funds. In the decades after the School for the Feebleminded opened at Faribault, however, three women, on their own and without public support, established the first group homes and day programs for persons with developmental disabilities. In 1897, Laura Baker, ...

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People and Places – April 2011

People and Places – April 2011 Granquist honored for advocacy  Luther Granquist, attorney for the Minnesota Disability Law Center (MLDC) for 36 years and a regular contributor to Access Press, was honored by The Arc Minnesota for his decades-long commitment to protecting and upholding the rights of people with developmental disabilities. “Few people have impacted the lives of as many Minnesotans with developmental ...

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Educable children

Advocacy groups, supportive members of the Minnesota Legislature, and a University of Minnesota professor collaborated to achieve approval by the 1957 legislature of a law, which mandated that schools provide “special instruction and services for handicapped children” considered “educable” according to standards of the state Department of Education. They also obtained approval of a law ...

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Southwest State welcomed students with a broad spectrum of disabilities

Southwest State welcomed students with a broad spectrum of disabilities Southwest Minnesota State was touted as a college intended to accommodate students with disabilities when it opened in Marshall in 1967. Howard Bellows, the first president of the college, came from Emporia State College in Kansas, one of the few state colleges designed to be accessible to students with physical disabilities. He framed the specialized ...

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Families created the Worthington Crippled Children’s School

Families created the Worthington Crippled Children’s School In the early 1950s, many children with physical disabilities were denied education in the public schools. Parents also lacked in-home support services and, often, any way to pay for needed therapies. At that time there were “hospital-schools” for “crippled” children in Illinois, Iowa, and the Dakotas. Although there were special schools for these children in ...

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Fight for Human Rights was lengthy

Fight for Human Rights was lengthy The Minnesota House, in 1973, had approved a bill supported by Handi-Registration, a self-advocacy group seeking to protect the civil rights of persons with disabilities. The bill expanded coverage for persons with disabilities in all areas covered by the Minnesota Human Rights Act. The Senate, however, refused to extend coverage in public services to persons ...

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Treatment of men was unspeakably cruel, painful

Treatment of men was unspeakably cruel, painful Editor’s note: The topic of this month’s History Note, while important in the context of past treatment of people with disabilities in state institutions, may be offensive to some readers.   Dr. Samuel Shantz, the first superintendent of Minnesota’s Hospital for the Insane at St. Peter, thanked God in his report to the Board of Trustees ...

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Conscientious objectors, media exposés, and institutional reform brought change for many

Conscientious objectors, media exposés, and institutional reform brought change for many Editor’s note: Access Press uses its 20th anniversary issue history note to salute others who have used the news media to call for change. During World War II, more than 3,000 conscientious objectors (COs) worked without pay in Civilian Public Service units established in 43 state mental hospitals and 15 state training schools, none of which ...

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Restraints were just plain wrong back then, too

Restraints were just plain wrong back then, too [caption id="attachment_1892" align="alignleft" width="150" caption="Minnesota State reformatory -1933"][/caption] METO, the Minnesota Extended Treatment Option at Cambridge, opened in 1999 to serve persons with developmental disabilities who present a risk to public safety. Last September, the Ombudsman for Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities documented excessive use of restraints at the program in a report, Just Plain Wrong. ...

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Lobotomies were ‘suitable’ treatment

In 1949, a neurosurgeon from the Mayo Clinic and the Superintendent of Rochester State Hospital wrote that prefrontal lobotomy was generally recognized as a suitable treatment of certain types of mental illness when more conservative measures failed to produce permanent results. A prefrontal lobotomy involved cutting nerve fibers of the frontal lobe of the brain, ...

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February 1997 Issue

Articles/Contributors: Does Governor Care? His Words Don't Say So, by Charlie Smith Unlawful Practices Reduce PCA Hours, by Luther Granquist Editor’s Column, by Charlie Smith Since Christopher Reeve. . . by Charlie Smith The "Dance Program Inclusive," by LeAnne Dahl Much to Give, Deaconess Jeanne Dicke Coping With Stress, by CeCe Chamber Hello Nicole, by Nicole More 1997 Legislative Issues, by Tom Brick Here’s the ...

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